Monthly Archives: November 2015

Great Lessons from Jimmy Casas on Hiring For Excellence

Last week I attended a great webinar presentation provided by NASSP with guest presenter, Jimmy Casas, on Hiring For Excellence.

Jimmy Casas www.jimmycasas.com

Jimmy Casas www.jimmycasas.com


Jimmy is the current principal of Bettendorf High School in Bettendorf, Iowa. He was named the 2012 Iowa Secondary Principal of the Year and was selected as one of three finalists for NASSP 2013 National Secondary Principal of the Year. Among his many other accomplishments, he co-authored a book with Todd Whitaker and Jeff Zoul entitled, What Connected Educators Do Differently. Check out his website for more great resources.

After I ran my notes by Jimmy, he gave me the thumbs up to share some highlights from his valuable advice for school leaders who are hiring new teachers or team members: Continue reading

3 Tips on Student Self-Reported Grades

Last week a teacher told me how excited she was to see the seemingly endless strategies teachers can use in helping students grow (see previous post).
selfreportingimage
As we talked about John Hattie’s list together, I began to think about how helpful it may be to focus on some of his specific strategies for more clarification.

Let’s start at the top of the list: The first strategy from Hattie’s list is “self-reported grades”, so here are three takeaways I wanted to pass along—one from a Hattie summary, one from my own experience, and a third from teachers at my school: Continue reading

10 Easy Literacy Strategies For Engaging Students

This summer some of our teachers attended Literacy Strategy as part of our before school professional development.

Image Source: http://classroom.synonym.com/

Image Source: http://classroom.synonym.com/


As a follow-up, we invited a Literacy specialist, Shannon Gaines, to spend a day with our teachers observing and providing feedback.

We scheduled half a day to walk her through a dozen classes so that she could observe interactions, lessons, and strategies already in play. Then we met in small groups with teachers for follow-up conversations.

As a school leader, I wanted to know what Shannon viewed as some strengths as well as where we could grow. The feedback was helpful: Continue reading