PMP:135 Using FOMO for Positive School Culture with Kim Coody

In a recent conversation with author and generation expert Dr. Tim Elmore, he shared how many students are affected by “FOMO” (Fear of Missing Out).

For many young people, this condition is demonstrated by a preoccupation with wanting to constantly know what is happening with peers or social media contacts. FOMO can sometimes lead to levels of anxiety that make it difficult for them to disconnect from social media. (See Psychology Today article by Dr. Elmore here.)

When Kim Coody, Principal of Glenpool High School, near Tulsa, Oklahoma told me she was creating FOMO experiences for her student, I was intrigued. She explained that this school year, her staff has committed to increasing engagement with students so that they fear missing out on school. What has this looked like for her school?

Kim’s Bio


Kim Coody has spent 21 years working with Oklahoma students as a special education teacher, high school assistant principal, middle school principal and high school principal. Kim has 15 years in secondary administration experience at Glenpool Public Schools. She began her administrative career as the high school assistant principal for 8 years. She spent 3 years as the principal at Glenpool Middle School before being named the high school principal in 2015.

In 2018, Kim was named Oklahoma’s OASSP High School Principal of the Year and represents the Oklahoma Association of Secondary Principals as President-Elect. Kim prides herself on Glenpool High School’s high graduation rate and her staff’s commitment to building positive relationships with students.

Leadership Takeaways

In this week’s podcast, Principal Coody shares several ways her school has built a strong culture:

1. Increasing positive “FOMO” with welcome back videos
2. Greeting students as they come to school
3. Developing more engaging lessons
4. Finding real-life applications for learning
5. Shadowing a student for a day
6. Piloting job shadowing and internships for seniors through Oklahoma’s ICAP (Individual Career Academic Plans)

As a result, Glenpool students are finding relevant applications for their learning, seeing fewer disciplinary referrals, increasing attendance rates, and making academic gains.

Listen-in to this week’s podcast for ideas that can inspire you in your school leadership. You can view a webinar version of our conversation or see Kim’s slides and photos HERE.

Now It’s Your Turn

How do your students view their experience in school? What are ways your team is enhancing your learning environment so that students are afraid of missing out on school? What ways can you put yourself in the roles of students to see school from their perspective? What is one way you can introduce them to real-life applications of learning?

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Principal Matters–The Book!


School leaders are very busy, so each of the twenty-four chapters is designed as a quick-read and followed with take-action questions for follow-up or reflection. If you want practical ideas on understanding your purpose, managing school teams, dealing with challenges, and leading with courage, action, motivation, and teamwork, go HERE to pick up a copy for you or your team.

Messaging Matters


Harness the power of messaging to create a culture of acknowledgment, respect, and celebration. Written specially for leaders, this title is divided into three parts, helping readers to maximize their role as chief communicators with students, teachers, and parents and community. Each chapter includes suggestions for using digital tools to enhance messaging and ends with reflection questions and practical next steps.

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