Tag Archives: decision making

PMP:059 How Does Scarcity Affect Your Mindset?

The other morning, on my drive to school with my daughter, I was listening to a story on NPR called The Scarcity Trap: Why We Keep Digging When We’re Stuck in a Hole by Shankar Vedantam.

Photo by Nathan Rein – Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License https://www.flickr.com/photos/45067812@N00


Researchers have determined that when people find themselves consumed with trying to simply survive, they often instinctively operate with tunnel vision. Sometimes they have poorer judgment. They tend to have a harder time thinking long-term. The urgent often overwhelms other important priorities.

In fact, one study looked at farmers in India who are paid only once a year after harvest. When their behaviors were observed before and after, their ability to make rationale, wise choices dramatically changed when their scarcity was replaced with abundance. Vedantam reports that other research has found that IQ scores actually lower when people test while experiencing scarcity than when experiencing stability. Continue reading

PMP 053: 3 Tips for Responding Under Pressure

When I was in high school and college, my brothers and I worked part-time diving for mussel shells in the Kentucky Lake area.

Photo by panuta – Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License https://www.flickr.com/photos/20881848@N00


We would sell them by the pound at local markets, and those shells would in turn be sold to Japanese markets. Apparently, the pearly-white cuts from those shells are unique implants for growing cultured pearls in oysters.

One day I was climbing across the bottom of an area that was ten to twelve feet deep. The only sounds I could hear were the hissing breaths from my regulator. As I found shells, I placed them in a net-bag I had clipped to one side of my weight belt. Continue reading

PMP 051: The Shocking Truth About Your Decision-Making

When I was going to graduate school for my Master’s Degree in Education Leadership, I decided to conduct my own informal research.

Photo by Great Beyond – Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License https://www.flickr.com/photos/26104563@N00


Over a number of weeks, I talked to current and retired principals about what they considered to be the lessons they had learned from their years in school leadership.

I remember one man in particular who was a retired teacher and administrator who had moved into higher education. We stood in the hallway one night after one my classes, and I asked him the question:

“What do you consider the greatest lesson you learned from your years as a principal?”

He looked down for a moment, and then looked back up at me and said. “I think I had to learn that I wasn’t always right. In fact, looking back now, I think I’d be lucky if I made the right decision 25% of the time.”

I was shocked. How could someone who seemed so articulate, competent, and confident say such a thing?

He smiled and explained. “Before you become the principal, you think you have all the answers. But once you take the position, you begin to realize how many things you don’t know…and sometimes you will call it wrong.”

“The sooner you accept that fact,” he went on, “The easier it will be to not be too hard on yourself when you make mistakes.”

I still remember walking away from that conversation in a daze. Continue reading